3 Producers fired from the Ellen DeGeneres show amid toxic work environment allegations

The Ellen DeGeneres Show has officially cut ties with three senior members of its production staff.

A spokesperson for Warner Bros. told E! News that executive producers Ed Glavin, Kevin Leman and co-executive producer Jonathan Norman “parted ways” with the syndicated talk show. Their exit comes amid allegations of a “toxic work environment” at the daytime series.

And while some are being fired, some are getting a promotion, as Ellen DeGeneres’ beloved show DJ, Stephen “tWitch” Boss, has been promoted to co-executive producer.

Ellen reportedly broke the news during a video conference call with her team on Monday, Aug. 17, an anonymous employee who was in the meeting told Buzzfeed News. Variety cited sources that claim DeGeneres was “emotional and apologetic” throughout the video call, and described the claims made about the environment on set as “heart-breaking.”

Ellen DeGeneres Show' Fires Three Top Producers - Variety

Additionally, remaining executive producers Mary Connelly and Andy Lassner reportedly addressed the findings of an internal investigation launched by Warner Bros. following multiple complaints of a toxic work environment. According to Variety’s sources, the investigation found no evidence of “systemic racism” on set, however, DeGeneres promised that she and the entire team will participate in diversity and inclusion training seminars.

On July 30, BuzzFeed News published a story in which dozens of former show employees anonymously claimed executive producers engaged in sexual misconduct and harassment. Another insider, however, provided a different perspective. “Behind the scenes, hours are long, employees are stressed and there’s nobody in power to go to for support…People are coming forward in hopes current employees are treated better.”

DeGeneres first broke her silence on the allegations in a letter sent to her staff and obtained by E! News on July 30.  “On day one of our show, I told everyone in our first meeting that The Ellen DeGeneres Show would be a place of happiness—no one would ever raise their voice, and everyone would be treated with respect. Obviously, something changed, and I am disappointed to learn that this has not been the case. For that, I am sorry,” DeGeneres wrote in part. “Anyone who knows me knows it’s the opposite of what I believe and what I hoped for our show.”

Similarly, Warner Bros. expressed their commitment to hearing the concerns of “as many people as possible attached” to The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

Main Image: BBC.com